The design psychology testing centre's approach sets itself apart from the methods normally used to measure user behaviour, combining known ethnographic methods with the latest psychophysiological measurement technology.

The interesting thing about the technologies used for psychophysiological measurements is that they are portable. This means that today, these measurements can be taken in users' natural environments, whereas it was previously necessary for them to visit a laboratory.

Psychophysiological measurements

The centre uses a variety of technologies, including:
  • Eye tracking
    Glasses and software that capture and analyse what we look at, in what order, and for how long. This can provide information about what test subjects look at and what they skip over. Among other applications, eye tracking is used to investigate how we operate machinery, how we read manuals, how we find a path through a space, and what captures our interest.
  • GSR
    Measures sweat production in (e.g.) the hands. This is an indicator of how the body prepares itself to respond to a stressful situation.
  • Facial expression analysis
    A webcam is used to record and identify small changes in our facial expressions, prompted by (e.g.) emotional impressions.
  • EEG
    Sensors and software that measure our mental workload when we operate devices or machinery, or our excitement and engagement when we select products or find ourselves in the middle of a monotonous workflow.
  • EKG
    Measures heart rhythms. This can provide insight into subconscious reactions to stimuli, such as a person's emotional state (neutral, happy, stressed, sad) in different situations.
We use equipment that measures respondents' psychophysiological parameters for various kinds of jobs and psychological studies, such as in retail sales and user testing of software.

An EEG records and analyses our mental workload and engagement, such as while we perform tasks.
An EKG measures heart rhythms. This can provide us with insight into subconscious reactions to stimuli, such as potential dangers.
Eye tracking uses glasses to capture and analyse what we look at, in what order, and for how long.
Facial expression analysis can be used to record and identify small changes in our facial expressions that occur as a result of emotional changes.
GSR measures the activation of sweat glands in our hands, which can reveal whether something excites us or makes us nervous.